The Hampton Hub

Warrant Article & Community Center Attempts Historical Information

Efforts to provide adequate communal space for the residents of Hampton extend back over 73 years. There have been 12 attempts to build a community center in the town of Hampton.

The townspeople of Hampton, its youth, families, adults and seniors deserve a place where they can come together as a community.  Having a community center at the hub of the town will strengthen the bond that the people of Hampton share with both the town and each other.

It will provide a place to build memories, share stories and experiences. It will provide connections among others of similar ages and interests; one group can help others. What could be more important for a community than providing a warm, welcoming, well- lighted place for neighbors and strangers to gather?

Let’s not delay this until it’s the “next time” or the “right time”! The time is now. We have all been isolated in one way or another by circumstances beyond our control (or the pandemic). Many of our citizens live alone and count on the town to provide a gathering place. Let’s build a place at the hub of our community today.

Timeline

2020s

Hampton Hub plans began with the Board of Selectman approval to include the project in the town CIP in March.

Due to ADA concerns, the Dorothy M. Little room was decommissioned as a public space within the library.

Decommission Letter

2010s

Warrant article 49, petition $200,000 to pay for a four-year lease open store front for senior center. 

  • Not Recommended by the Board of Selectmen 5-0-0
  • Not Recommended by the Budget Committee 12-0-0
  • Vote was: Yes – 765 No – 2113*
    The article failed. 2014 Town Report Warrant Article

Library asked the Board of Selectman to hold the lawn of the old court house for potential library use.

Trustees Letter of Request

Board of Selection Meeting Minutes

2000s

Warrant article 72, petition to raise and appropriate the amount of $150,000 to renovate the old Town Hall making the necessary repairs and improvements to turn it into a Senior Center for the residents of the town of Hampton, NH.

  • Not Recommended by the Board of Selectmen
  • Not Recommended by the Budget Committee
  • Vote was: Yes – 931 No- 2260
    The article failed. 2008 Town Report Warrant Article

Warrant article 32, petition to raise and appropriate the amount of $100,000 to renovate the old Town Hall, making the necessary repairs and improvements to turn it into a Senior Center for the Town of Hampton. 

  • Not Recommended by the Board of Selectmen
  • Not Recommended by the Budget Committee
  • Vote was: Yes – 1073 No – 1664
    The article failed. 2007 Town Report Warrant Article

The Town began the master plan process for the so-called Government Center by hosting a Plan NH Charrette on September 21 & 22. A charrette is a period of intensive work involving both professionals and local citizens to explore potential solutions to a design issue. A volunteer team of design professionals put together by Plan NH worked with local officials and residents over the two days to develop conceptual plans for reuse/redevelopment of the municipal property/buildings from the current Town Offices east to Fire Station 2, including Lane Memorial Library, the Hampton Academy/Junior High School and the former District Courthouse. Everyone involved is eagerly awaiting the final product of the charrette, a design booklet which will summarize the work, including plans, drawings and final recommendations that the Plan NH team developed through the process. -Town Report 2007, Planning Board & Planning Office

Warrant article 18 was to raise and appropriate the sum of $45,000 for the purposes of preparing conceptual design plans that would include at a minimum preparing a feasibility study, a study of space and site needs, and the development of floor plans and elevations for a community center for the Town of Hampton?

  • Recommended by the Board of Selectmen.
  • Recommended by the Budget Committee.
  • Vote was: Yes – 1196 No – 2376
    The article failed. 2005 Town Report Warrant Article

CIP Committee urges School Board to consider year-round community center as part of their renovation of Hampton Academy Junior High.

Warrant article 22 was to raise and appropriate the sum of $600,000 to demolish the old town office building located at 136 Winnacunnet Road and build a new Senior Center there?

  • Recommended by the Board of Selectmen.
  • Recommended by the Budget Committee.
  • Vote was: Yes – 1436 No – 1601
    The article failed. 2003 Town Report Warrant Article

Warrant Article 20 was to raise and appropriate the sum of $68,000 to demolish and replace the Cave building at Tuck field. 

  • Not Recommended by the Board of Selectmen
  • Not Recommended by the Budget Committee
  • Vote was: Yes – 876 No – 1679
    The article failed 2002 Town Report Warrant Article

Warrant Article 11 was to raise and appropriate a sum not to exceed $360,000 for the construction of athletic fields, including lighting, restrooms, and concession facilities at the Campbell property purchased in 1996 for the purpose of recreation and conservation.

  • Recommended by the Board of Selectmen
  • Not Recommended by the Budget Committee
  • Vote was: Yes – 1365 No – 2319

The article failed 2000 Town Report Warrant Article

Warrant Article 14 was to raise and appropriate the sum of $80,000 to demolish the existing dilapidated structures at Tuck Field and construct new recreation facilities at Tuck. 

  • Recommended by the Board of Selectmen
  • Recommended by the Budget Committee
  • Vote was: Yes – 2073 No – 1577

The article passed 2000 Town Report Warrant Article

1990s

“We continue to make improvements to the area around the former town landfill with the development of various recreation facilities along Hardardt’s Way… Steps are being initiated for a new police facility, and more land is set aside for recreation and conservation on the Campbell farm property on Towle Farm Rd.” 

 “While you are downstairs, stop in the Dorothy Little Room and see the temporary Senior Drop-in Center there. [sic] The Trustees of the Library have granted interim use of the room until the Seniors find a home of their own, or until the Library requires the space for library functions. 

 “Major things happened for the Senior Citizens in town this fall. Joan Kahl, an employee of the Lane Library came up with the idea of a temporary senior drop-in center at the library. And it was approved by the Trustees.

The temporary facility, the Library’s Dorothy M. Little room, was given over to the Recreation Department Senior Citizen’s Club for a drop-in senior center during all daytime hours. This stopgap measure remained in use for 23 years.

Warrant Article 16 was to raise and appropriate an amount up to 162,400 to be used to exercise and existing purchase option to acquire 14+/- acres of land and buildings located on Towle Farm Rd know as the Campbell Farm. The intent is to use this land for town recreation and conservation purposes.

 In addition to her other duties, Director of Recreation & Parks Dyana Lassonde has been helping to plan the best recreational usage of the virgin land adjacent to the closed landfill. The pad for inline skating facility was laid in the fall, and this winter the ice skating rink will get a first test. The soccer field should be ready by Spring 1997 and we hope to grade the sloe off Landing Road as a safe sledding area for youngsters. Some members of the Board took one of the Chairman’s 9am Saturday morning tours with Dyana and the Manager this fall, and inspected all of teh Park & Recreation facilities. Dyana has been encouraged to submit a warrant article in 1997 to fund the replacement of the deteriorated concession stand at Eaton Park, and possibly a second article to fund construction of another storage shed/concession stand at the landfill recreation area. 

 The closing of the landfill and the opening of the transfer station also opened the property to the development of a new recreation facility. During the winter, it is anticipated that a skating pond will be available, and in the sprong facilities will be open for soccer, basketball, and inline skating. The addition of the Campbell Farm property provides additional land to the Town for recreation and historical preservation.

Warrant Article 15 was to raise and appropriate the sum of $135,000 for the purpose of purchasing the two lots adjacent to Park Ave, commonly known as Eaton Park.

  • Recommended by the Board of Selectmen
  • Recommended by the Budget Committee
  • Moved by John Walker, Seconded by Arthur Moody
    The article passed 1994 Town Report Warrant Article

In March, we are asking the Town to purchase nearly five acres of recreation land adjacent to Tuck Field.” 

1980s

Warrant article 11 Louisa Woodman offered an amendment, seconded by Susan DeMarco to add $100,000 to the budget for a capital reserve fund for a future recreation center.

 Warrant article 12 petitioned to see if the Town will raise and appropriate the sum of $2,995,000.00 for the purpose of building and equipping a Community Center in accordance with the drawings and specifications prepared by the Design Builder in accordance with Article 20 of the 1987 Town Meeting by the issuance of Serial Bonds or Notes not to exceed $2,995,000.00 under and in compliance with the provisions of the Municipal Finance Act (N.H.R.S.A 33:1 et. seq. as amended) and to authorize the Selectmen to issue and negotiate such bonds or notes and to determine the rate of interest thereof, and to take such other actions as may be necessary to effect the issuance, negotiations, sale, and delivery of such bonds or notes as shall be in the best interest of the Town of Hampton. (b) To allow the Selectmen to apply for and accept such monies which may become available through state or federal grants and/or private sources.

Warrant article 16 requested that the following item be placed in the Town Warrant for consideration at the Annual Town Meeting to be held on the second Tuesday of March, 1987: (a) To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the sum of $2,950,000.00 dollars for the purpose of building and equipping a Community Center in accordance with the report and recommendations submitted by the Recreational Facilities Study Committee to the Board of Selectmen for their November 10, 1986 meeting, said sum to be raised by the issuance of Serial Bonds or Notes not to exceed $2,950,000.00 under and in compliance with the provisions of the Municipal Finance Act (N.H.R.S.A. 33:1-18 et. seq. as amended) and to authorize the Selectmen to issue and negotiate such bonds or notes and to determine the rate of interest thereof, and to take such other actions as may be necessary to effect the issuance, negotiation, sale, and delivery of such bonds or notes as shall be in the best interest of the Town of Hampton. (b) To allow the Selectmen to apply for and accept any such monies which may become available through state or federal grants and/or private sources. (NOT recommended by the Budget Committee) 
MOVED: Arthur Brady SECONDED: Glyn Eastman 
Arthur Brady MOVED TO INDEFINITELY POSTPONE Article 16, seconded by Glyn Eastman. The Motion passed and Article 16 was indefinitely postponed. 

Warrant article 20 requested for consideration at the Annual Town Meeting to be held on the second Tuesday of March, 1987: (a) To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the sum of $100,000 Dollars for the purpose of preparing final drawings and contract documents for a Community Center in accordance with the report and recommendations submitted by the Recreational Facilities Study Committee to the Board of Selectmen for their November 10, 1986 meeting.
(b) To allow the Selectmen to apply for and accept any such monies which may become available through state or federal grants and/or private sources. 
MOVED: Michael Edgar SECONDED: Arthur Brady 
AMENDMENT: James Fallon SECONDED: Dona Janetos 
“To strike out of section (a) the following words: ‘in accordance with the report and recommendations submitted by the Recreational Facilities Study Committee to the Board of Selectmen for their November 10, 1986 meeting. 
The Fallon Amendment PASSED. 
ARTICLE 20 PASSED, as amended.

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1987 showed $100,000 for Community Center Drawings

Warrant article 21 was to accept the Budget as Submitted by the Municipal Budget Committee and to raise and appropriate the sum of $7,017,808. The Article was moved by Paul Nersesian, Chairman of the Municipal Budget Committee, seconded by Glyn P. Eastman. An amendment was offered by Robert “Vic” Lessard, seconded by Russell Bridle, to increase the budget by $97,000.00 to bring all Town employees equal to 8 1/2% pay raise. The question was moved by AshtonJ. Norton,seconded by Margaret Lawrence. The motion to move the question carried. The Lessard amendment failed. An amendment was offered by William Teschek to increase the Library account by $9,133.00, seconded by Mary-Louise Woolsey.
The Teschek amendment failed. 
An amendment was offered by Arthur Brady to increase Election and Registration Expense by $600.00 increasing the salaries of the Supervisors of the Check List each $200.00 seconded by James F.Fallon.
The Brady amendment passed. The question was moved by Robert “Vic” Lessard, seconded by Paul Nersesian. Article 21 passed as amended.

Creation of a Committee to Study Matter Passes

Warrant article 26 to raise and appropriate the sum of $85,000. for the restoration of the Arnold Property. Article 26 was moved by Ashton J. Norton, seconded by William Bowley. The question was moved by Paul Nersesian, seconded by Robert Ross. The motion to move the question carried. A request for a secret yes/no ballot was made by Elizabeth H. Weinhold, Irene C. Palmer, Ansell W. Palmer, Mary E. Palmer And Diane D. LaMontagne. A counted vote was: YES: 62 NO: 153 Article 26 failed.

 An amendment was offered by Louisa K. Woodman to create a seven (7) member study committee to study the needs of our Town for a community recreation facility and report to the Town by December 31, 1985. Said committee to be appointed by the Moderator, two representing senior citizens, two members of the Recreation Advisory Council and two representing youth of our community, seconded by Kenneth Malcolm.

 Warrant article 55 was to permit the public library to retain all money it receives from its income-generating equipment to be used for general repair and upgrading and for the purchase of books, supplies and income-generating equipment. This article is pursuant of RSA Chapter 202-A:11-b.Statement of Appropriations, Expenditures and Encumbrances. Article 55 was moved by Robert “Vic” Lessard, seconded by Paul Nersesian. Article 55 passed.

 The members of the Recreation Advisory Council, Hampton Youth Association, Hampton Senior Citizens’ Club, and various other individuals committed to our community, have long since recognized the need to expand upon the recreational facilities available to the people of Hampton. As this Department continues to work to its best ability, it appears that without growth in facilities and personnel, this “one person” Department is functioning at full capacity.

Warrant article 6 petitioned to see if the Town shall permit the public library to retain all money it receives from its income-generating equipment to be used for general repair and upgrading and for the purchase of books, supplies and income-generating equipment. This Article is pursuant to RSA Chapter 202-A:11-b.

Warrant article 26 To see if the Town will vote to have the Public Works Department move the existing garage on the Arnold Property to a suitable location on the Tuck Field Property for use of the Town Recreation Department; subject garage to be placed on a concrete slab to be furnished by the Hampton Historical Society.

 Warrant article 43 contained the minutes Mrs. Loris Burbine suggested the Selectmen appoint a study committee to look into the feasibility of providing an indoor pool for the children in the Town of Hampton. The Moderator suggested that she bring her proposal before the Board of Selectmen. Paul Nersesian moved to adjourn, seconded by Ray Hutchinson.

Warrant article 13 to see if the Town will raise and appropriate the sum of $1,223,000.00 Dollars for the purpose of building and equipping an addition to the Lane Memorial Library in accordance with the report and recommendations submitted at the 1983 Annual Meeting by the 1982 Lane Memorial Library Study Committee, said sum to be raised as follows: a. $790,000.00 Dollars of said sum to be raised by the issuance of Serial bonds or Notes not to exceed $790,000.00 under and in compliance with the provisions of the Municipal Finance Act (N.H.R.S.A. 33:1 et. seq. as amended) and to authorize the Selectmen to issue and negotiate such bonds or notes and to determine the rate of interest thereof, and to take such other actions as may be necessary to effect the issuance, negotiation, sale and delivery of such bonds or notes as shall be in the best interest of the Town of Hampton; b. $250,000.00 Dollars of said sum to be raised by withdrawal of same from the capital reserve fund established for such purpose by the 1981 and 1982 Annual Meetings; c. $100,000.00 Dollars of said sum to be raised by contributions from other sources; and d. $83,000.00 Dollars of said sum to be raised from interest anticipated to be accumulated on all the aforesaid sums until expended; the provisions for the withdrawal and expenditure of funds from the capital reserve fund acceptance of contributions from any and all lawful sources and expenditure of same, and all other matters relating thereto to be delegated to the Selectmen. (Recommended by the Budget Committee)

The Moderator recognized the Chairman of Lane Memorial Library Study Committee, Mr. Richard Millette.

Article 13 was moved by Robert V. Lessard and seconded by Ashton Norton. Kenneth Malcolm moved the question after discussion and his motion was seconded by Paul Nersesian. The motion passed. Since passage required a ⅔ majority the polls were opened at 10:30 A.M. and closed at 1:30 P.M. giving everyone a chance to vote on the question. The results of the vote were: YES 586 NO 91 Article 13 passed.

  • Recommended by the Budget Committee
  • Moved by Kenneth Malcolm, Seconded by Paul Nersesian
  • Vote was: Yes – 586 No – 91
    The article passed 1983 Town Report Warrant Article

 Warrant article 14 to raise and appropriate to add to the Capital Reserve Fund for the purpose of constructing a new library or an addition to the Lane Memorial Library the sum of One Hundred Thousand (100,000.00) dollars due and payable December 31, 1983,for the purpose, to be added to such other monies as may be received for such purpose, in accordance with RSA 35. All interest earned on said appropriation shall be added to the said Capital Reserve Fund. (Recommended by the Budget Committee) The moderator suggested that Article 14 would become moot if Article 13 passed, and recommended skipping Article 14 until after the polls closed on Article 13 at 1:30 P.M. The motion to postpone was made by Paul Nersesian and seconded by Glyn Eastman. The motion passed. After the announcement that Article 13 had passed by more than a 2/3 majority, Paul Nersesian moved that Article 14 be indefinitely postponed, seconded by Glyn Eastman. The motion passed and Article 14 was indefinitely postponed. 

Warrant article 9 was to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to purchase approximately five (5) acres of land and the buildings thereon known as 239 Winnacunnet Road, in the Town, from Isabella G. Nudd, through her Guardian Electra Savage, for the purpose of constructing a new library and, in connection therewith, to raise and appropriate the sum of $150,000 to purchase the same within sixty (60) days from March 9, 1982, and further, after the purchase of said property, to retain the gravel appraised at $180,000 and to raise and appropriate the sum of $46,000 to extract the gravel: and further, to subdivide the present house with a lot of 125′ x 300′, containing 37,500 square feet, for the purpose of selling the same to the highest bidder at a price of not less than $50,000 which will be returned to the General Fund. (Not recommended by the Budget Committee.) Article 9 was moved by Ashton Norton, seconded by Diana LaMontagne. An amendment was offered by Glyn Eastman, seconded by Robert “Vic” Lessard, to delete “for the purpose of constructing a new library.” The amendment passed. A yes/no ballot was requested by the members of the Board of Selectmen. Article 9, as amended, failed. YES: 73 NO: 227

  • Not Recommended by the Budget Committee
  • Moved by Ashton Norton, seconded by Diana LaMontagne
  • Vote was: Yes – 73  No – 227
    The article failed 1982 Town Report Warrant Article

 Warrant article 10 was in the event the Town votes to adopt the above Article, to see if the Town will vote to adopt one of the following two alternatives: (A) To retain the land and building constituting the “Lane Memorial Library” for such future use as the selectmen of the Town may determine. (B) To authorize the Selectmen to sell the land and buildings constituting the Lane Memorial Library to the highest bidder at a price of not less than $120,000, and apply the proceeds of said sale to the Capital Reserve Fund for the construction of a new library. Article 10 was moved to be indefinitely postponed by Barbara Ryan, seconded by Glyn Eastman. The motion passed and Article 10 was indefinitely Postponed.

Warrant article 11 was to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate to add to the Capital Reserve fund for the purpose of constructing a new library or an addition to the Lane Memorial Library the sum of ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND ($100,000.00) DOLLARS for the purpose, to be added to such other monies as may be received for such purpose, in accordance with RSA 35. All interest earned on said appropriation shall be added to the said Capital Reserve Fund. (Recommended by the Budget Committee.) Article 11 was moved by Kenneth Malcolm, seconded by Dorothy Little. Article 11 Passed.

Warrant article 47 To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Moderator to appoint a five member committee for the purpose of overseeing the construction of an addition to the existing library. Article 47 was moved by Ashton Norton seconded by Robert “Vic” Lessard. Peter Randall, seconded by Donna Janetos, moved to amend Article 47 by ” change period and comma and add that said committee be authorized to present a report for action to the next Town Meeting.” The Moderator suggested a substitute Article as follows: “To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Moderator to appoint a 5 member committee for the purpose of serving as a library study committee to make recommendations to the next annual Town Meeting whether to the construction of a new library or an addition to the existing library.” The substitute Article Passed.

  • Moderator suggested a substitute Article

The article failed 1982 Town Report Warrant Article

Warrant article 12 petitioned  to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $82,944.17 to purchase the land, buildings and swimming pool owned by the Seacoast Youth Center, situated on Park Avenue, in Hampton. Article 12 was moved by James Metcalf, seconded by Roland Paige. After discussion Mrs. Parr moved the question, seconded by Mr. Bridle.  Ayes/no ballot was taken and the Article failed.

  • Not recommended by the Budget Committee
  • Moved by James Metcalf, Seconded by Roland Paige
  • Vote was: Yes – 162  No – 208

The article failed 1982 Town Report Warrant Article

Warrant article 7 petitioned to see if the Town will vote to establish a Capital Reserve Fund for the purpose of constructing a new library or an addition to the Lane Memorial Library, and to raise and appropriate the sum of ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND $100,000) DOLLARS for the purpose, to be added to such other monies as can be received for such purpose, in accordance with RSA 35. All interest earned on said appropriation shall be added to the said Capital Reserve Fund. (Not recommended by the Budget Committee.)

Article 7 was moved by Allen L. Mason, seconded by Phyllis Tucker. The question was moved by Raymond Lafrance and seconded by Philip McDonough. Article 7 passed by more than 2/3 rds.
Not recommended by the Budget Committee

Warrant article 3 was to raise and appropriate the sum of $985,000.00 to be added to a gift of $25,000.00 (plus accrued interest due to date) made by Wheaton J. Lane, said total amount to be used for the purpose of building an addition to the Lane Memorial Library; and Authorize the Selectmen to issue and sell such bonds and/or notes in an amount not to exceed $985,000.00 under and in compliance with the Municipal Finance Act (Chapter 33 of the NH Revised Statutes Annotated and any amendments thereto), and any other enabling authority, and determine the rate of interest to be paid thereon as may be necessary to effect issuance, negotiation, sale and delivery of such bonds and/or notes as shall be in the best interests of the Town of Hampton, N.H.; and Authorize the Selectmen to enter into agreements and contracts and to take other action necessary to complete said Library addition and apply for and accept State and/or Federal grants in aid of said project; and Any other action in connection with the aforegoing matters or any of them. The Article was moved by Alan L. Mason, seconded by Mary-Louise Woolsey and the polls were open for voting from 11:00 a.m. until 12:05 p.m. The count was: Yes 264, No 272. The Article failed.

  • Not recommended by the Budget Committee
  • Moved by Alan L. Mason, seconded by Mary-Louise Woolsey
  • Vote was: Yes – 264 No – 272
    The article failed 1982 Town Report Warrant Article

1970s

Warrant article 2 was to raise and appropriate the sum $960,735.00 to be added to a gift of $25,000.00 made by Wheaton J. Lane, said total amount of $985,735.00 to be used for the purpose of building and equipping an addition to the Lane Memorial Library in accordance with the report submitted at the 1978 Annual Meeting by the Library Study Committee, said sum to be raised by the issuance and sale of notes and/or bonds of the Town of Hampton in accordance with the Municipal Finance Act, in the principal amount of $960,735.00, maturing over a twenty year period, the provisions for the sale of the notes and/or bonds and all other matters relating to, to be delegated to* the Selectmen. (Recommended by the Budget Committee)

Warrant article 2 was moved by Michael McCarthy, seconded by Dona Janetos. A Yes/no ballot was taken. Yes: 195, No: 247. The article failed

  • Recommended by the Budget Committee
  • Moved by Michael McCarthy, seconded by Dona Janetos.
  • Vote was: Yes – 195 No – 247
    The article failed 1978 Town Report Warrant Article

 Warrant article 22 On petition of Michael McCarthy and signatures of 12 registered voters of the Town, to see if the Town of Hampton will vote to: Contract for or accept grants of Federal or State aid or both in connection with the construction of any addition to the Lane Memorial Library approved by the Town at this Annual Town Meeting, 1976, and to expend such grants to pay or reduce the indebtedness incurred on account of such construction. Moved by Suzanne Ficke, seconded by Robert Bridle, Article 22 passed.

Warrant article 2 was to raise $500,000 to be added to a gift of $25,000 made by Wheaton Lane, to build and equip an addition to the Lane Memorial Library. Moved by William Barkley and seconded by Dorothy Little.
Voted: 104 in favor, 260 opposed.
The article failed

Warrant article 10 was to add to the $3,000 raised by the Friends of the Library to pay an architect to design an addition to the Lane Memorial Library. Moved by Jean Ashfield, seconded by Cal Wiser. Discussion. Article 10 passed.

Warrant article 13 was to have the Town contract for, or accept, grants of Federal or State aid, or both for the construction of the library addition. Moved by Dorothy Ingram, seconded by Dorothy Little. Article 13 passed.

Almost every program has had an increase in the number of participants than in 1976. More and more citizens, youth, adults, and senior citizens are becoming involved! December 1977, the Senior Citizens Club has over 300 members. The seniors meet on the second Thursday of each month at the United Methodist Church on Lafayette Road.

Warrant article 5 appropriated $5,000 and appointed a committee to begin planning a library addition.

However, for Hampton to continue its well-rounded varied program, help is needed in two very important aspects: volunteer service and land facilities. With an increase in programs, many more volunteers are needed to fill the increasing number of leadership roles. Any and all volunteers with skills in various fields are greatly needed. Hampton is also lacking in recreational park space. At this time, the accepted standard ratio of recreation space per population is 1 acre / 100 people. This figure assumes and already takes into account school properties. Thus, Hampton, with a population of approximately 10,000 should have 100 acres of recreational space to adequately meet the population needs. At the present time, we have approximately only 20 acres of recreational park space! If expansion of this gross deficiency is to be done, it must be started now before all the land is utilized for residential and commercial purposes. This expansion is mostly needed in the western section of town where very little park space exists.

Warrant article 20 To see if the Town will vote to: Abolish the Recreation Commission as established by vote of Town Meeting on March 13, 1956 due to the fact the Board of Selectmen has appointed a Recreation Advisory Council to assist the town’s Recreation Director in preparation, organization and functioning of the town’s recreation program.

Mr. Neal Socha, Recreation Director, was hired in June as authorized by Special Article in last years Town Meeting. He has done an excellent Job in the short time that he has been in town and has established a very comprehensive recreation program for fiscal year 1973 to be enjoyed by young and old alike.

The first full time Recreation Department for the town of Hampton, began operation on July 10, 1972.

Warrant article 11 To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $6,000 for the purpose of employing, by June 1, 1972 a full time Director of Recreation for the Town. Submitted by the Budget Committee without Recommendation

When asked if the town should acquire upland open space for future use as parks, cemeteries, schools or recreational facilities, 72% said yes. 78% favored increasing the minimum residential lot size to one acre and 79%, favored acquiring scenic easements along the Taylor River and Hampton River to preserve those shorelines.

1960s

Warrant article 33 petitioned to see if the Town of Hampton will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $120,000.00 over a two year period, for the purpose of obtaining land and constructing a Community Center for the use of the Residents of the Town of Hampton. The purpose of this Community center would be for the year round use of the residents for their so- cial and recreational life of all age groups. This center would also fill the need for a Town Hall and could be constructed so that it would be the nucleus of the eventual relocation of the Town Offices which the town growth will soon require. This multi-purpose recreational building would also serve as a Youth center and a Senior Citizen Center. We hope and expect a positive vote on this article so that this often discussed and needed town fa- cility will become a reality.

Mr. Chester Mullen expressed the opinion that we should undertake a program of education and recreation as is being done at Fort Lauderdale to combat the tendency toward rioting and delinquency at the Beach. He felt that instead of preparing to arrest more people, we should try to make it unnecessary to arrest so many.

Mrs. Virginia Blake said that everyone knew that the reason for the proposed rezoning of Winnacunnet Road was to allow a Post Office building to be built on the vacant lot adjacent to the Library, so why not discuss it? She stated that such a location would be convenient to the Town Offices where a great deal of business is done, and that it would help to distribute traffic and not create a worse bottle-neck in Hampton Center.

1950s

Warrant article 7 to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000.00) to implement the research and planning studies of the Memorial Civic Center Committee, to authorize the continuance of this committee and to authorize the committee to engage in other activities designed to further the program as follows:

(a) To utilize funds provided by the Congress of the United States for the advance planning of public works programs. Long term, interest free loans are made available to municipalities, the repayment schedule of which is so designed as to require no payment until such time as the town is engaged in the actual work of construction and then only as each portion of the overall construction program is completed. And further
(b) To assist the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen in preparing an application and contract for these federal funds authorized under Section 702 of Public Law 560, 83rd Congress, as amended, and as administered under the Housing and Home Finance Agency, such funds to be used for the engineering, site planning and design of the proposed Memorial Civic Center. And (c) To assist the Town Manager in developing a program including site selection, procurement of land purchase options, negotiations with competent professional firms experienced in the design of municipal buildings and the preparation of contracts for architectural services provided for under the aforementioned federal fund program.

Warrant article 8 to see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of seventeen thousand dollars ($17,000.00), this money to be invested at the highest rate of interest. This amount to be put aside each year to be used for the erection of a municipal center.

1st Addition to the Library Since 1932
Community Center Study Presented

Warrant article 17 to see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000.00) to be added to a gift of Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,000.00) pledged by Howard G. Lane and Wheaton J. Lane, said Thirty-five Thousand Dollars ($35,000.00) to be used for the purpose of building and equipping an addition to the Lane Memorial Library and to authorize and empower a Committee consisting of the Library Trustees and three residents of the town to be appointed by the Moderator to determine the size of the addition, to solicit bids and accept the most advan-tageous bid or bids, to supervise the construction, to purchase the equipment, and to take any other steps necessary or desirable in connection therewith.

Warrant article 33 of the Warrant for the 1956 Town Meeting called for the Moderator to appoint a committee of seven citizens to consider the advisability of erecting at some future date by means of voluntary sub- scriptions and taxation, a memorial municipal build- ing with adequate parking space, so located and so designed that it may serve (1) as a Town Hall, (2) a Community Center, and (3) as a convention facility which might be helpful in attracting early and late season business to Hampton Beach. The committee was to report its findings to the next regular Town meeting. The article was adopted. [sic] 

However, the immediate necessity—apparently fully recognized by this and other adjacent communities for a new High School building, would make necessary the deferment for at least one year of even long-range plans for the development of a memorial municipal center, designed to serve the needs enumerated in the governing Article.

For these reasons the committee respectfully requests that the foregoing be accepted merely as a report of initial progress and requests furthermore that it be continued for another year, at the conclusion of which time, a more detailed, comprehensive and factual report will be submitted for the consideration of the voters.

CREATION OF A COMMITTEE TO STUDY MATTER PASSES

Warrant article 11 to see if the town will vote to authorize the appointment of a Recreation Commission, to act in an advisory capacity with the Town Manager.

Warrant article 33 petitioned to see if the town will vote to authorize the Moderator to appoint a committee of seven citizens to consider the advisability of erecting at some future time by means of a voluntary subscription and taxation, a municipal memorial building and adequate parking area, so located and so designed that it may serve (1) as a Town Hall, (2) as a community center, and (3) as a convention facility which might be the means of attracting early and late season conventions to Hampton Beach, said Committee to report its findings at the next regular Town Meeting.

Warrant article 22 petitioned to see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money at the rate of one and one-half (.5) cents per one hundred ($100) dollars of the town valuation (said appropriation not to exceed $1,500) for the employment of instructors and the promotion of recreational activities.

Warrant article 23 petitioned to see if the town will vote to authorize the appointment of a Recreation Commission to act in an advisory capacity with the Town Manager in carrying out the purposes of the above Article 22 

1940s

A special Warrant for the call of the meeting was read by the Moderator John W. R. Brooks, after which the meeting was declared open for business. Remarks by John W. Perkins in regard to the meaning of the meeting, he explained what it means to build a new building at this time as regards expense, and the amount the town would be able to raise for this project, after which John W. Perkins made a Motion: That a committee be appointed to study the needs of the Town for offices, Police Station, Fire Station, Municipal Court, Town hall and Community Center.

The recreation industry is a vital part of the economic structure of the Town. The growth of the recreation business depends upon the preservation and improvement of our natural assets, the maintenance and improvement of facilities for accomodation, entertainment, sports, and adequate and improved highway and transportation facilities.

The community responsible is primarily one of providing for the recreational needs of its residents as well as its summer tourists.

1930s

The lot adjoining the Library on Academy Avenue has been bought by the town. This will give the town the control of the lot, and will insure that no building that will detract from the beauty of the Library will ever be erected on it. It will also make possible the expansion of the Library building to the rear in time to come.

Warrant article 13 was to see if the Town will vote to buy a lot of land adjoining- the Library on Academy Avenue, and to raise and appropriate the sum of $500.00 for same.

Warrant article 15 was to authorize the Selectmen, in conjunction and cooperation with the Trustees of the Tuck Memorial and Historical Association, to administer the Tuck Memorial Park and Historical Association and the Tuck Athletic Field as one project; the house to be used as a residence for the caretaker as part of his salary, and the balance of the expense to be taken from the appropriations for Parks and Playgrounds and to raise and appropriate, if necessary, such additional sums for the expense of the above project.

For the first time in its history the library has received an adequate appropriation. In times past the library has been the “Little Orphan Annie” of the town’s departments, and has thankfully accepted what the voters were willing to hand out to it. The money at their disposal has enabled the trustees to make many improvements that were badly needed. Water has been introduced into the basement and excluded from coming in through the roof. A toilet and lavatory have been installed and a dry well dug for the waste water. The books have been catalogued, and now by referring to the cards in the cabinet any volume can be located instantly.

The time had come, however, when it was necessary to enlarge the library building or discard many books, for the capacity of the structure was exhausted. They chose the latter alternative. They thought that it was the psychological moment to make other changes that had long been needed. The Hampton library was the only library in the State where the people were not given access to the books. Open stacks had long been desired by the public. [sic] The trustees discovered that the library building itself and some of its equipment needed attention. There was a leak in the roof which threatened to do serious damage. The coving needed to be repainted. The furnace was broken and required new parts and resetting. Book cases had to be built. They found that the funds available were entirely inadequate, and they have been compelled to practice the most rigid economy. The trustees feel that the town should appropriate at least two thousand dollars a year for the support of the library. The library building was built and dedicated in 1910. So far as we can find out not one cent has been expended on it for repairs and upkeep since that time. There is no water in the building.

1920s

Janitor Service – The care of the Center building particularly during the winter season is becoming too great for one man to handle effectively. Our standards of cleanliness, temperature and ventilation during the day, plus an average of two to three evenings a week cannot be maintained with one janitor. The burning of soft coal and the increasing use of the building for community purposes is Beginning to produce a deteriorating effect upon the building which can only be offset by more frequent cleaning. I suggest a part-time assistant for this purpose.

In the Community – The Centre building is rightly becoming a real community center. The frequent gatherings of community organizations in hall and lunch room have been very gratifying. In just this way is the building serving its real purpose. During the year 1923-1924, 26 moving picture en- tertainments were given on Friday or Saturday even- ing. An extended trial proved Friday to be the more desirable for the larger number.

I must make a plea for the boys and girls of the Academy and perhaps at the same time for all the boys and girls of our community. We have an excellent playground at each of our schools but there is practically no playground apparatus. Our children do not know how to play because we are sadly lacking In playground’ facilities, yet there is plenty of room to install swings, a teeter-board, a giant stride and like apparatus for little people. Besides, we ought to provide some place convenient to the centre of the town, that would serve as a gymnasium, where the older boys and girls could play basket ball, indoor baseball and the like, in winter. The play activities of children, under normal and healthful conditions, are just as essential for all-round development as the regular school subjects.

1910s

For a number of years the friends and patrons of the Library had been impressed with the fact that larger and better accommodations were very much needed. It is with great pleasure we can report this need has been fully met in the new Memorial library building, the generous gift of Mr Howard G. Lane, in memory of his father, Joshua A Lane. The dedication and presentation to the town occurred on Dec 14, 1910.